Somebody Does Love You! (Sept – Dec 1994)

By Matt Dabbs

by Mike Cope
September – December, 1994

Somebody Does Love You!, Editorial by Mike Cope, p. 7, vol. 2, num. 8

Jeremy Bullock seemed to live the kind of life we nostalgically wish for. Growing up in a hillside home in Butte, Montana, he was about as far from gang assault rifles as imagination allows. This eleven year old’s life was vintage Norman Rockwell: school, sports, a best friend, and lots of laughter.

But just after Easter last year Jeremy was gunned down while waiting in line to enter Margaret Leary Elementary School. Three bullets were fired: one burrowed into a book bag, another whizzed past the school principal’s niece, and the third struck Jeremy behind the ear.

What about the murderer? An escapee from a local prison? Another angered employee who’d been fired? A psychopath who’d finally gone over the edge? No. The killer was a ten year old.

The diminutive murderer had been the object of many taunts on the school playground. His parents, long divorced, were both dying of AIDS. He and two other siblings were being raised by an eighteen-year-old brother. The morning of the shooting, the local paper ran a front-page article about his mother.

A few hours later the boy carried a .22 semiautomatic pistol to his school, calmly loaded it, and fired three times. Shortly after that he sat in the principal’s office staring into space. He muttered three heartbreaking words: “Nobody loves me.”

What does it do to someone to believe that no one loves them completely and unconditionally? Could it make them reserved? Bitter? Unable to love? Or maybe even angry enough to execute others (with words or bullets?)? People who aren’t bathed in unconditional love tend to pass all the dirt, grime, and mud on to those around them.

What about you? Are you one of those emotionally crippled individuals who never experienced love without strings attached? If you aren’t sure, try answering this five-question exam:

1) Do you find yourself being judgmental of the motives of others quite often?
2) Do you tend to hold others at a distance and get close only as a way to reward them?
3) Do you seem to have a lot of bitterness? (Or, perhaps a better way to ask this, Would others describe you as a bitter person?)
4) Do people close to you often disappoint you?
5) Do you view yourself as a colossal failure at nearly everything you do?

Healing can only come when you realize that there is no person on this earth who can supply all the love you need! There is no parent, no spouse, no child, no friend who can fully understand you and offer the full, cleansing bath of unconditional love.

Only God can do that. And he has done everything imaginable to tell you how much he loves you! He put in Scripture point-blank statements that scream out like billboards. He has used a variety of word pictures. He has conveyed stories.

But ultimately, here’s how you know. God loved you so much that he came for you in Jesus Christ. He came to show you what genuine, uncompromising love looks like. He came to bear your sins and iniquities. He came to carry your sorrows. “This is love: not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son as an atoning sacrifice for our sins” (1 John 4:10).

Christmas is a time of deep healing. God has entered our world so that we, by his grace, might enter his. He has set before us a banquet of unfathomable love.

Feast on it!Wineskins Magazine

Mike Cope

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Profile photo of Matt DabbsThis author published 1579 posts in this site.
Matt is the preaching minister at the Auburn Church of Christ in Auburn, Alabama. He and Missy have been married 12 years and are raising two wonderful boys, Jonah and Elijah. Matt is passionate about reaching and discipling young adults, small groups, and teaching. Matt is currently the editor and co-owner of Wineskins.org.

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